• Mombasa investors have turned old dhows into floating restaurants to give local and foreign tourists a new experience in the hospitality industry. 

    Most of the high-end hotels have opted for the trend which is picking up in the Coastal towns of Mombasa, Watamu and Lamu. 

    The old dhows were selected from a pool that was previously used to transport cargo and passengers among the towns.

    They were then remodelled to suit the business classes, which contain bar and lounges, kitchens, dining and resting areas. 

    Customers enjoy meals and music at a floating restaurant aboard a dhow in Mombasa, Kenya
    File

    Hotel owners allow customers to enjoy lunch, dinner and breakfast afloat the Indian Ocean, at specified fees.

    There are three types of dhows offered by investors; sundowners, lunch and dinner cruises. 

    “Lunch is 2 hours and dinner cruisers operate up to 4 hours. Lunch cruise begins from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Dinner cruise begins at 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

    “Once you get on the dhow we serve you with a starter, the soup. Then we serve you with the main course order then the dessert,” a manager at one of the cruisers disclosed.

    Some dhows even play music, with different bands performing in the morning, noon and in the evening. 

    Passengers added that they love the ambience and the serene environment as compared to having dinner at a club or restaurant in the city. 

    The Ministry of Tourism stated that the industry was one of the most affected industries during the Covid-19 pandemic owing to travel restrictions imposed across the world.

    Hotels were shut down leading to lose of jobs too. However, the reopening of the country and the decision to allow bars, hotels and eateries to operate up to 9 p.m. was a boost to the industry.